Last days of old price before A Grammar of Modern Indo-European, Second Edition, is approved for Extended Distribution into thousands of outlets in the U.S.

The book A Grammar of Modern Indo-European will be approved for Extended Distribution into thousands of outlets in the U.S., including Bookstores & Online Retailers as well as Libraries & Academic Institutions.

The distribution costs will then be of 26,95$/book, so we will need to put a minimal price of 27$ (probably slightly higher), so that we don’t lose money by selling books through retailers. That means around 7-8$ more than its current retail price at Amazon.

This change will be made after the newest revision is published, with the latest changes and corrections to version 4.15. The revised version will be sent to the editor in the first days of January, and from that moment on the book won’t be available for sale. After the approval of the new version, the new price will apply.

That change in price will also be needed to publish the book in the future in French, Spanish and German, due to the higher costs of traditional distribution channels in Europe, compared to online print-on-demand publications from the U.S.

Your Indo-European Language Team.

Problems (again) with the webservers, new services added for, and more grammars donated to European libraries

Newest developments of the Association:

  1. Our webservers didn’t function correctly until the 20th of July, probably since June – i.e. just the period we couldn’t take care of them – due to some new configuration of the DSL by Spanish main telecom Telefonica, or, according to them, because of the “wrong installation / reparation by the technical service” last year, which was actually made by their official service 😕 . Apparently, then, we have to withstand technical problems of our Internet devices once a year…
  2. The new webmail accounts are already working using Google’s Gmail. That means some relief for our servers, and an easier administration of the accounts. There is also an email list for (allowed) subscribers at The first member blog has been created at the domain, too. All those options are still only opened for members, but we hope to be offering them for simple registered users in the near future. You can begin requesting them right now, though.
  3. After the failure of Orkut’s group, probably due to the limited success it has in countries different from Brazil and India, a new group has been created in Facebook, in the hope that it becomes a popular social network in Europe. More than a way to communicate between members, it should be a forum to spread and discuss the project with those interested in it.
  4. Some more grammars have been donated to European public and university libraries. New additions might be followed, as always, from the library donations page. There are some 170 books already, and hopefully we’ll be sending some 20 more to libraries related to the European Union (in Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg) in the next weeks. After that, more copies of the printed edition will probably be needed to continue this donation campaign, or else stopped for some time.
  5. The Association is represented by the French Chauvet Cave Bear logo, because it represents the oldest tradition/history of Central Europe and therefore its original, prehistorical inhabitants. We eventually selected a symbol to represent the language (and therefore projects like Europaiom), the Danish solvogn or “sunwagon“, because that is probably the oldest representation we have of what are (and were) common symbols of those who spoke Europe’s Indo-European in the latest PIE community in Northern Europe until ca. 4.000 years ago: the horse and the wheel, or, better, the horse and the wagon. The solvogn (of ca. 1800-1600 BC) was most probably made within an already differentiated Proto-Germanic community, but is nevertheless representative of the common ancient Indo-European language and culture of Europe. It therefore represents the purity looked for with the modern language system in relation to the prehistorical European language we try to revive at Dnghu.

Your Indo-European Language Association Team.

Bible texts translated into Indo-European, new European public and universitary library donations and other Indo-European projects

These are our latest projects and developments at DNGHU:

– Some Bible texts have been translated, thanks to the interest of M. Bobeck and B. Barrois – we didn’t translate the Genesis and Psalms 90 and 104, as expected, but give it some time. Available texts include the Lord’s Prayer, Hail Mary, Credo (Nicene Creed), the Parable of the Prodigal Son and the beginning of the Gospel of John.

– We will keep working on the Indo-European online language lessons website. Any corrections or additions are indeed welcome.

– We have included some 30 new research papers to our Indo-European Private Online Library for members only.

– We are collecting new addresses of European Universitary and Public libraries, and expect to send a hundred donated books more in the next weeks.

– We are planning to participate in a project about Comparative Medical Terms and Concepts in Indo-European Tradition, especially of Indian, Greek and Latin texts, but obviously including the oldest texts available of every Indo-European linguistic branch. If any of you would like to take part on it, feel free to contact us.

– We have received an ad from the ExpoLingua Berlin, the 21st International Fair for Languages and Cultures – they really know who to target… If some of you (rich) readers would like to donate the necessary amount to participate, we would be very grateful to you 😉 . You can visit their website to read more about it.

Your Indo-European Language Team.

Printed copies of A Grammar of Modern Indo-European, donated to dozens of European public libraries

NOTE: If a copy arrived to your library, please send us a confirmation mail

We have eventually sent dozens of printed copies of A Grammar of Modern Indo-European to different European public libraries, mostly within the European Union, and all of them to University libraries.

We are adding the libraries that were sent a copy (or those with available copies of the grammar) to our Map of Library Donations, including the library address and its website if available, to facilitate a quick query for those interested in reading the book in its printed version.

We plan to send at least a hundred copies more in the following months, but we want to see how our donations are (or aren’t) welcomed by the different university and city libraries. If some copies aren’t accepted or just don’t arrive to the expected destination, we will be able to send another copy to the same library, or to a different one in the same area. We try to keep a balanced distribution of books depending on different factors such as number of inhabitants of the target city (or metropolitan area), number of students/readers who use the library, university prestige, etc.

Remember that if you are a member of a public or private institution dedicated to higher education and/or research, you can request free donations of the Modern Indo-European grammar.

Your Indo-European Language Team.