Indo-European Translator-Dictionary, Indo-European Grammar printed editions, public stats and Google Ads

These are our latest developments following the beginning of the new year:

  1. We have eventually published our Indo-European Translator-Dictionary (again) before it works correctly, in a pre-alpha or aleph version. We preferred to face the challenge of possible fatal errors of MySQL and a worse character output (bad UTF encoding) than to wait for months to release it. It is the next generation of our WLQO dictionary-translator project at SourceForge, which has been abandoned due to the comeback of the Open Translation Engine (OTE) project, on which WLQO was based.
  2. Because our main sales (since we first started to sell our Indo-European Grammar in November) have come from Spain, we decided to publish it in other (international) book stores, namely those people already trust, and which are flexible enough for us to be able to modify our files – from Amazon to Lulu, from our Editor to us, there is a greater degree in flexibility, but a lesser degree in consumer confidence, we guess. As always, those printed editions are prepared for those who don’t want to read our work in their computers, or who prefer professional editions rather than their own printer’s outputs.
  3. More than 2 years ago we decided not to earn money with Google ads, because most free projects rely on donations, and we wanted to look like what we are, a not-for-profit society. We knew then, and it’s been confirmed, that most donations come from the USA and other similar ‘donation-cultures’; we kept the hope that some enthusiast could provide us with some means to cope with our costs, but apparently no such person is interested in (or even knows) the Indo-European language revival, as we have still the same (Spanish) institutional donors. Because we have (apparently*) thousands of visitors each month, we think it’s fair to get something back from those visitors, and are thus offering different Google ads, which in no way disrupt the normal functioning of our site.
  4. *Apparently the visit numbers (for a static website like ours) were big – up to 50.000 visits a month following Webalizer, which takes on account every page load, up to 10.000 unique visitors after Awstats , which sifts the data -, beginning on April (following the publication of Indo-European Revival news in Spanish media), growing until August, and growing each month a little bit after that. Now we are not so sure of those numbers our server logs give, and want to have official statistics. We know that most log files can only be made from our server, as documents in PDF, RAR, ZIP, images, etc. are not logged by Statcounter, and that it uses javascript (and therefore many users go unaccounted for), but at least we’ll have a good, independent stats counter to be used, especially for future petitions of (private or public) subsidies.

Your Indo-European Language Team.

New Indo-European resources, European education fairs and bandwidth limits

The title states the three main reports this week:

1) We are currently adding some new resources, not only on the Proto-Indo-European language and about its reconstruction, but also on other old Indo-European dialects, to help students of Indo-European languages get free online resources more easily. For example, we added yesterday Monier’s (Public Domain) Sanskrit Dictionary in PDF.

2) About the public subsidies the Association is applying for, we have also requested some financial help to take part in some European education and language fairs this year. We want to promote the project, the Proto-Indo-European reconstruction, and indeed the common culture and linguistic heritage of the majority of Europeans, and the Internet cannot be the only way to do so if we want to succeed in our Indo-European language revival project.

3) We are experiencing some bandwidth problems, due to the unexpected number of visits – from little more than 5.000 visits a month since December, we got more than 12.000 visits on April and May, and around 50.000 visits in June. We haven’t still promoted the website among university students, but seeing our difficulties in keeping a good upload rate for all visitors, we will wait (at least) until August to begin a wider promotion. Meanwhile, we’d like to see those who already know it discuss the possible changes to be made this summer, about every possible aspect of the Associatin and its work.

We expect to get a better connexion soon, hopefully thanks to private donations. If the visitors’ rate keep increasing as in the past months, we’ll have to begin thinking about using Google adsense (or other ads’ company) and hire some more professional expertise, though, because normal donations and friends’ work won’t be able to cope with our needs.

Your Indo-European Language Team.

Still another change in domain names' strategy: stronger shift to 'Indo-European'

As the number of visitors increases, it becomes obvious that those coming from Google searches are also becoming the majority – instead of those coming from fixed external links, which was our best source until recently.

Now, even though we cannot know how Google’s pagerank (and thus search results) function, we do know that domain names are important.

Our recent strategy was to distantiate ourselves from Esperanto and other constructed languages’ projects; we wanted to be identified just with Indo-European language revival, with the modern use of a natural – althoug reconstructed – language.

Following this recent strategy, we have changed our europaio and sindhueuropaiom subdomains – a cheaper and more simple way of presenting the project – with different domains, selecting the most important languages in terms of population and Internet use, and also depending on the project (.eu for europaio, .org for sindhueuropaiom): indoeuropeo.eu (it), indo-europeen.eu (fr), indo-european.eu (en), indoeuropejski.eu (pl), indoeuropeiska.eu (sv), indogermanisch.eu (de), indo-europees.eu (nl); also proto-indo-european.org (en), indoeuropeo.org (es), indo-europeen.org (fr), indogermanisch.org (de), indoevropejskij.org (ru), indo-europeu.org (pt)

Your Indo-European Language Team.