New europaio.org Wiki websites, new language projects and change of Dnghu’s domain name language policy

The latest changes in the Association:

1. We decided to change our Indo-European Language Association domain name language policy, from a standard of “.eu” domains and translated terms written as is in the language, we want to offer a more unified writing, thus using almost only “.org” and names without dashes – but for indo-european.eu, which was the only available, and indoeuropeo.eu in Italian, because the .org is reserved for the Spanish version. At the same time, we hired some more domain names in Danish, Czech, Lithuanian, Latvian or Slovenian.

2. Our main aim was – and still is- to revive Europe’s Indo-European as the national language of the European Union, not the common Late PIE, because of the difficulties in reconstructing it with sufficient confidence. However, given that:

  1. Speakers of languages derived from Proto-Germanic, Proto-Italic, Proto-Celtic, Proto-Slavic and Proto-Baltic are not the only ones interested in reviving Proto-Indo-European in one of its dialects.
  2. Reviving Late PIE phonology with exactitude is still as impossible as in Saussure’s time.
  3. As with Proto-European (or Europe’s Indo-European), we know the shape of those Proto-Indo-European dialects that existed ca. 2500 BC.
  4. All reconstructed PIE dialects are different to some extent only, especially in phonology, but very similar in morphology and syntax,.

We want to offer the possibility of using all the reconstructible PIE dialects as of 2500 BC (see a map), i.e. Proto-European or Europe’s Indo-European (IE IIIb); Proto-Indo-Iranian or Proto-Aryan and Proto-Greek (both IE IIIa); and Proto-Anatolian, a dialect of IE II; as well as discussing the theoretical aspects of Proto-Indo-European reconstruction. All of these projects have a Wiki dedicated to discuss its reconstruction and the modern shape the language should have today (europeanlanguage.org, aryanlanguage.org, helleniclanguage.org, anatolianlanguage.org and protoindoeuropean.org), and another Wiki dedicated to its experimental use, as a kind of Wikipedia-Wikisource-Wikinews (europaiom.org, arijam.org, hellenika.org, anatali.org, respectively).

3. We have consequently closed or rearranged the websites dedicated to write in Europe’s Indo-European: they will be concentrated in that website mentioned above, europaiom.org. Only the Indo-European etymological Wiki dictionary will remain.

With those changes we expect to concentrate efforts, attract more collaboration and spend less.

Your Indo-European language team.

Indo-European Translator-Dictionary, Indo-European Grammar printed editions, public stats and Google Ads

These are our latest developments following the beginning of the new year:

  1. We have eventually published our Indo-European Translator-Dictionary (again) before it works correctly, in a pre-alpha or aleph version. We preferred to face the challenge of possible fatal errors of MySQL and a worse character output (bad UTF encoding) than to wait for months to release it. It is the next generation of our WLQO dictionary-translator project at SourceForge, which has been abandoned due to the comeback of the Open Translation Engine (OTE) project, on which WLQO was based.
  2. Because our main sales (since we first started to sell our Indo-European Grammar in November) have come from Spain, we decided to publish it in other (international) book stores, namely those people already trust, and which are flexible enough for us to be able to modify our files – from Amazon to Lulu, from our Editor to us, there is a greater degree in flexibility, but a lesser degree in consumer confidence, we guess. As always, those printed editions are prepared for those who don’t want to read our work in their computers, or who prefer professional editions rather than their own printer’s outputs.
  3. More than 2 years ago we decided not to earn money with Google ads, because most free projects rely on donations, and we wanted to look like what we are, a not-for-profit society. We knew then, and it’s been confirmed, that most donations come from the USA and other similar ‘donation-cultures’; we kept the hope that some enthusiast could provide us with some means to cope with our costs, but apparently no such person is interested in (or even knows) the Indo-European language revival, as we have still the same (Spanish) institutional donors. Because we have (apparently*) thousands of visitors each month, we think it’s fair to get something back from those visitors, and are thus offering different Google ads, which in no way disrupt the normal functioning of our site.
  4. *Apparently the visit numbers (for a static website like ours) were big – up to 50.000 visits a month following Webalizer, which takes on account every page load, up to 10.000 unique visitors after Awstats , which sifts the data -, beginning on April (following the publication of Indo-European Revival news in Spanish media), growing until August, and growing each month a little bit after that. Now we are not so sure of those numbers our server logs give, and want to have official statistics. We know that most log files can only be made from our server, as documents in PDF, RAR, ZIP, images, etc. are not logged by Statcounter, and that it uses javascript (and therefore many users go unaccounted for), but at least we’ll have a good, independent stats counter to be used, especially for future petitions of (private or public) subsidies.

Your Indo-European Language Team.

Indo-European quick reference dictionary based on Pokorny’s Indogermanisches Etymologisches Woerterbuch

Wlqo’s Europaio version of Pokorny’s main work, Indogermanisches Etymologisches Wörterbuch (The Indo-European Etymological Dictionary) is now also available in the resources section of Dnghu’ website.

It has been posted mainly to show newcomers how Europaio (or modern Proto-Indo-European) resembles the Indo-European languages they speak, as many people are already saying Europaio is a language system too difficult to substitute English as Europe’s main language.

We think that cognate words are a great source for knowing Indo-European vocabulary better, and still better to show people how different Europaio is from a constructed language or conlang.

Your Indo-European Language Team.